The house that compassion built

by Tracy Green on July 20, 2015 Comments Off on The house that compassion built

The North Shore’s Hollyburn Family Services Society, funded in part by United Way, receives 400 phone calls each month from emergency service providers, hospitals or neighbours concerned about a homeless senior or a senior at housing risk. Up until now they weren’t always able to help. Now thanks to a The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring that matched 30 volunteers from McCarthy Tétrault to a meaningful volunteer project, a house that had been slated for demolition has been transformed into transitional housing for vulnerable seniors. “United Way of the Lower Mainland came to our rescue providing us with a crew of eager volunteers through their Day of Caring. There is no way we could have done this without their help. These efforts are helping turn a house into a home for our most vulnerable citizens,” explains Nanette Taylor, Executive Director, Hollyburn Family Services. “The stories I hear have really surprised me: police finding seniors living in a car or wandering the beach; seniors needing to flee abusive situations from their spouse or their children,” adds Nanette. “Now when we get a call to provide help to a senior with nowhere to go, we can actually respond.” This effort transformed a house to a home for seniors at risk in less than 7 weeks. With the help of many partners and a great deal of community support, this is the house the compassion built.

A newly renovated room, ready for a new resident.

Volunteers cleaning up the outside garden.

McCarthy Tetrault Hollyburn volunteers helping transform a house for homeless and at risk seniors.

McCarthy Tetrault Hollyburn volunteers at the ready!

 

Tracy GreenThe house that compassion built

United Way hires new VP of Resource Development

by JenniferY on July 6, 2015 Comments Off on United Way hires new VP of Resource Development

Brenda Aynsley Headshot Brenda Aynsley is United Way of the Lower Mainland’s new Vice President of Resource Development. She starts on August 24th. Brenda joins United Way of the Lower Mainland after having been the Executive Director of Thompson Nicola Cariboo United Way for the past 11 years. In that role, she built strong partnerships with community, government, media and donors positioning United Way Thompson Nicola Cariboo as a community impact organization. Prior to working for United Way, Brenda was an area manager for the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC and Yukon. Brenda also has on the ground social service experience: she was a program director at Kamloops Youth Resources, and more locally, a supervisor and front-line worker at Maples Adolescent Treatment Centre in Burnaby. Brenda has been honoured for her community work. She is a recipient of a Queens Diamond Jubilee Medal for community service and a recipient of a City of Kamloops Pioneer Spirit Award. She is a current nominee for a RBC Women of Influence award. Welcome Brenda!

JenniferYUnited Way hires new VP of Resource Development

Policy wonks develop mad skills

by JenniferY on July 2, 2015 Comments Off on Policy wonks develop mad skills

The graduating class from the 2015 United Way Public Policy Institute.

Congratulations to the class of 2015! Twenty-three community leaders have all graduated from United Way’s innovative professional development program, the Public Policy Institute (PPI). Graduates walk away with new knowledge, skills and tools so that they are better able to understand and influence the public policy process. Leaders from a wide range of organizations from the Early childhood Educators of BC to the West End Seniors Network attended this year. PPI brings together not-for-profit leaders from across the province with experts in the field for monthly two-day training sessions from January to June each year. PPI Faculty include former Premier Mike Harcourt; former MLA Elizabeth Cull; corporate director Brenda Eaton; health policy expert Dr. Liz Whynot and Ida Goudreau, Adjunct Professor, Sauder School of Business. “You’ve done great work at PPI this year but it’s what you do when you leave here that counts,” encouraged PPI Faculty Mike Harcourt. Special thanks to Premier Sponsor Vancity and to UBC Robson Square for generously providing meeting space. Information and applications for the 2016 session of the United Way Public Policy Institute will be posted soon. For more information contact Yves Trudel at United Way of the Lower Mainland at ppi@uwlm.ca.  

JenniferYPolicy wonks develop mad skills

Homeless seniors now have a place to call home

by JenniferY on July 2, 2015 Comments Off on Homeless seniors now have a place to call home
McCarthy Tetrault Hollyburn volunteers at the ready!

McCarthy Tetrault Hollyburn volunteers at the ready!

Homeless seniors. These are two words that don’t sit comfortably together. Yet every month, the North Shore’s Hollyburn Family Services Society, funded in part by United Way, receives 400 phone calls from emergency service providers, hospitals or neighbours concerned about a homeless senior or a senior at housing risk. Up until now, explains Nanette Taylor, Executive Director of Hollyburn Family Services Society, they weren’t always able to help. Now thanks to a The Vancouver Sun United Way Day of Caring that matched 30 volunteers from McCarthy Tétrault to a meaningful volunteer project, a house that had been slated for demolition has been transformed into transitional housing for vulnerable seniors. “United Way of the Lower Mainland came to our rescue providing us with a crew of eager volunteers through their Day of Caring. There is no way we could have done this without their help. These efforts are helping turn a house into a home for our most vulnerable citizens,” explains Nanette Taylor, Executive Director, Hollyburn Family Services. The house was donated and is structurally sound but required a lot of work to transform it. The Lynn Valley Lions pulled up old carpet and flooring and have committed to paying utilities. The crew from McCarthy Tétrault worked together to clear out junk, clean the house, and paint the house. Not only that, they also raised an additional $8,000 to help Hollyburn deliver the program. “The stories I hear have really surprised me: police finding seniors living in a car or wandering the beach; seniors needing to flee abusive situations from their spouse or their children,” adds Nanette. “Now when we get a call to provide help to a senior with nowhere to go, we can actually respond.”

JenniferYHomeless seniors now have a place to call home